AnviewTech

The court found the evidence failed to prove that AnviewTech had legal authorization to carry the program. It ordered the portal to stop infringement and pay Shuimu Animation 20,000 yuan in compensation as well as 5,000 yuan in legal fees.
“TV set makers are relieved,” Beijing attorney Chen Nan told Legal Evening News. “The verdict won’t cause a contraction in the entire industry.”
Following the ruling, more cases targeting online video providers are expected because copyright owners stand a high chance prevailing in court, he said.
Chen added that the ruling will have an impact on the nascent Internet TV content industry still in its startup stage.
Li Zizhu, a judge in Chaoyang district court with long experience in IP cases, said copyright disputes over film and TV programs are often the result of repeated authorization through layers of companies.
Copyright owners grant the authorization to online companies that in turn authorize another firm, a practice that is not legally binding, Li said.
Along the chain, the final party will be liable for infringement damages, according to the current copyright regulation, the judge added.
Beijing attorney Liu Lin said the field is clouded with uncertainty due to close associations between local Internet TV manufacturers and video portals as well as repeated authorizations.
Using the Internet on a TV is now entirely feasible with existing technology, Ding Zhong, head of an interactive media industry federation, told local media.
At a cost of less than 200 yuan, manufacturers can sell a TV set for an additional 2,000 yuan if it is Internet compatible, Ding said.
Yet due to a lack of uniform industry standards, various producers use a range of chips and operating systems. An open application platform has yet to be adopted that would make different brands compatible, industry insiders said.